ART SHOW @ NAMARA projects

Daisy Chain, M, untitled 220201-180902, and Coronas (NAMARA Projects, ART SHOW)
Daisy Chain, M, untitled 220201-180902 (NAMARA Projects, ART SHOW)

A curated exhibition at the NAMARA Projects space, that took place October 22, 2022 — January 6, 2023. The works were selected from across several bodies of work and informed by the following tenets:

Practice here involves a persistent discovery and wielding of new creative tools, strategies, and ideas.
An aim to reveal the hybrid and fluid nature of things. 
This body is mine but I am not my body. 
Art is an unlikely extension of nature. 
Assistance as a partnership. 
Perspectivism reigns.

untitled, 2022-191219 in ART SHOW @ Namara Projects
Daisy ChainMuntitled 220201-180902Coronas, and Summer Fleece in ART SHOW @ Namara Projects
Summer FleeceWaves, and Room 15 2 in ART SHOW @ Namara Projects
Summer FleeceWavesRoom 15 2, and As the Sea Curves in ART SHOW @ Namara Projects
Room 15 2As the Sea Curves, and Homo Deus in ART SHOW @ NAMARA Projects
As the Sea CurvesHomo DeusDive, and Blue Lei in ART SHOW @ Namara Projects

I have been witnessing Alex Fischer’s practice throughout their professional career. Technology has always been instrumental to the artist’s process and its impact is evident in the content of resulting printed works. Fischer addresses narratives around technological production, online personhood, and digital authorship. These remain significant to the artist’s practice and hold new consequence in the age of tokenized digital art.

Equally important are the tethers Fischer maintains to traditional art and in particular, conventions of painting. The artist employs myriad digital brushstrokes. Textures, palettes and implied hand are sampled from historical and contemporary works alike. Fischer amalgamates manifold style, resulting in one that is undeniably their own. The artist’s oeuvre is in tension with itself. Seemingly unwilling to give in to digital tropes, visual language is neither a challenge nor concession to prevailing digital modes of artmaking.

Unlike previous series, collections or exhibitions, Art Show brings The Body to the fore. Dynamism characterizes youthful bodies, absorbed into their surroundings–or maybe not. Perhaps the figures are in fact emerging from their conditions. Are these scenes of struggle or performance? Are these avatars labouring within the digital space in which they were conceived–Seeking to separate, or at least to distinguish form from matter?

Fischer does not provide an answer. They embrace the “hybrid and fluid nature of things.” The artist plays with convention and embraces uncertainty. They point to the humanity in digital space without succumbing to it. Even in the more abstract compositions, the audience recognizes certain reflections: Eyes, limbs, movement, and flesh are present but more or less entwined with place.

Disentangling is work for the viewer.

Natalie MacNamara, Principal & Creative Director, NAMARA
Beside Two Hemispheres Called A Brain, 2022-190720, a unique 11×8½inch glossy gicleé with oil pastel, 16×13½ inch matted and framed.
M, 2022-140829, a unique 28×22½ inch matte gicleé mounted to aluminum, 30×24½ inch framed.
Waves, 2022-211217, a unique 12×7⅘ inch matte gicleé, 17;×12⅘ inch matted and framed.
Room 15 2, 2022-210428, a 49×40 inch exposure on 53×44 inch Fujiclear mounted acrylic, suspended
Coronas, 2022-200309, a unique 32×40inch matte gicleé mounted to aluminum, 34×42 inch framed.
Daisy Chain, 2022-220202, a unique 28×41½ inch matte gicleé mounted to aluminum, 30×43½ inch framed.
As the Sea Curves, 2022-180310, a unique 32½×26inch inch matte gicleé, 41½×35 inch matted and framed.
Blue Lei, 2022-150913, a unique 19×15 inch matte gicleé, 28×24 inch matted and framed.
Homo Deus, 2022-171224, a unique 87×58 inch matte gicleé mounted to aluminum.
Dive, 22022-220811, a unique 72×58 inch matte gicleé mounted to aluminum.

Smarter Today @ O’Born Contemporary

Smarter Today

Alex Fischer, Solo Exhibition
October 28 – December 4, 2010

Smarter Today offers a human view of futurist landscapes, a view that explores the ideologies and projections of society through the lens of contemporary art.

Alex Fischer composes his figures and landscapes by assembling a variety of visual and conceptual sources. Keeping in mind that ideas of the future are inevitably the fastest to change, Fischer maintains that human nature is a fallible and susceptible state.

Technological advancement and machine generations have vastly outpaced the tradition of the average human life. As a society, we have adapted to accept the pace at which vast differences and contrasts will influence our modes of being. All projections of which are unpredictable beyond our present context. Today more than ever before, we situate ourselves less as individuals and more as the product of multiple networks. While this network theory suggests a node’s relationship to other networks is more important than its own uniqueness, we find a backlash of reflection on individual circumstance and identity.

The subjects and characters of Smarter Today are reflections on the syncretism that created them. Their exterior identities have been extricated to include all of their precursors. They are heterogeneous and intermingled with their environments, yet maintain their subjectivity in the face of a post-structuralist world.

Smarter Today is Fischer’s debut solo exhibition with O’Born Contemporary.

(LEFT) The Invisible Man Returns 2010 47.88 × 32.00
(RIGHT) Cooks Cape 2010 60 × 84
Cooks Cape, 2010,
Trouble on Volcano Sundae, 2010,
Artists Retreat, 2010,
Trouble on Volcano Sundae, 2010, 16 × 14.7
Artists Retreat, 2010, 16 × 14.7
Grandfather Wreath, 2010
Three Fates, 2010, 60 × 92 in
(FAR LEFT) Bring Home the Bacon, 2010, 15 × 20 in
(LEFT) Untitled Greens, 2010, 15 × 20 in
(RIGHT) Figure Head, 2010, 57 × 55 in
Bring Home the Bacon, 2010,
Untitled Greens, 2010,
Knight (installed)
Teen Dream
Monster Mash
Good Grief
Fungus Philosopher
Dweller
Knight (installed)