Shanghai 海上 ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea

ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上, 2020, ≅15’×15′ water cut aluminium, white paint. On display at CG iAPM, Shanghai, China.


Inspired by the work of Qavavau Manumie.
Canada Goose commissioned ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上 for their flagship Shanghai location. This piece was designed with the building facade in mind, as a way of creating a unique artist presentation, viewable from the store interior and exterior, alike.

A suspended sea plant landscape of where the ocean meets the land. A convergence. Fischer used linework from traditional Chinese landscape painting, illustrations of neuronal bridges, and representational elements from Manumie’s drawing practice.

Shanghai is located where the confluence of two rivers meets the Pacific ocean. The piece is intended to be an embodiment of where different worlds meet referring both to Canadian culture in China, and Southern Canadian and Inuit cultures represented in this piece.


SAMPLE INSPIRATION

Innervation of Purkinje Cells, Courtesy of the Cajal Institute, Spanish National Research Council or CSIC
Qavavau ManumieUntitled, 2016, 585×760mm / 23×30inch coloured pencil, graphite, and ink on paper
Qavavau ManumieUntitled, 2016, 585×760mm / 23×30inch coloured pencil, graphite, and ink on paper
Qavavau Manumieuntitled (Berry Picking), 2006-2007, 508×660mm / 20×26inch coloured pencil, pentel pen on paper
Qavavau Manumieuntitled (people and stick figures), 2008, 508×660mm / 20×26inch coloured pencil, graphite, and ink on paper

FABRICATION

ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上 aluminium fabrication at Baoding Hailong Metal
ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上 aluminium fabrication at Baoding Hailong Metal

Toronto Story Tree

Story Tree, 2020, ≅15’×15’∅ aluminium tree, acrylic paint, pine base with steel counterweight on display at Canada Goose, Yorkdale Mall, Toronto, Canada

Qavavau Manumie’s drawings are the seeds from which Story Tree has grown. Manumie’s work is idiosyncratic and often amusing in his depictions of Inuit legends and mythology, Arctic wildlife and contemporary aspects of Inuit life. It is through this lens of cultural wisdom and whimsy that Alex Fischer has interpreted Manumie’s drawings for Story Tree. Equally significant is the influence of Kenojouac Ashevak, and Inuit art forebears to Fischer’s practice of digitally collecting, collaging and redrawing a site-specific tribute with a presence of its own.

Through the simplest means of bi-fold asymmetry, Fischer has planted Manumie’s drawings in physical space. Story Tree brings together distinct Northern and Southern perspectives with the mind of the viewer as their integral subject.