Miami Pairs Pop-up

Blue Parrots, 97½ × 132 in digital lightbox
Untitled Pairs, 97½ × 132 in digital lightbox

When does a soul become dyed with the color of its thoughts? These large images both face themselves and face away. Reaching and spiraling both inward and upward, they are poised and revealed, always re-centering on some in-between space and embracing a warmth of details to call their own. 

Untitled Pairs and Blue Parrots are exhibited alongside a selection of works by Saimaiyu Akesuk, curated by NAMARA for the Canada Goose Miami Pop-up.

Saimaiyu Akesuk, Mating Birds, 2023, coloured pencil and ink
Saimaiyu Akesuk, Love in in the Air, coloured pencil and ink
Saimaiyu Akesuk, Polarbird, 2023, coloured pencil and ink

Giving Entry @ NAMARA projects

Giving Entry
at NAMARA projects


Curated by Natalie MacNamara
July 9 — September 10, 2022

an exhibition featuring works by
Michael Dumontier + Neil Farber,  Alex Fischer, Nelson HenricksRick LeongZachari LoganTerran McNeelyJohn MonteithJanet MortonDainesha Nugent-PalacheNicotye SamayualieKristin SjaardaWinnie TruongEmma WelchXiaojing Yan

Giving Entry is an exhibition of works by artists who employ flowers or floral motifs in considerations of social, philosophical, and political subjects. What matters most is the embeddedness of these blooms in their particular stories. Within this exhibition, flowers are put to work symbolically in varied artistic inquiries. Counting among them are built narratives around equality and difference; history, memory, and temporality; environment and climate; speculation and the supernatural.


Other exhibition images, photos by Alex Fischer

Harbin 在司徒 In Situ

Alex Fischer: 24 hour animation loop on a 18’×9′ LED Video Display
Polymetis landscape waveform: 20’×60′ polymer, steel, lights

In the summer 2021 Canada Goose commissioned artist duo Polymetis and Alex Fischer to create an installation for a 20’x60′ public window display in the heart of Harbin China. Historically, in ancient China, “Situ” was one of the highest-ranking government offices, with an original translation meaning Administrator of Land. As artists we perform a similar survey on the natures from which we bear witness.

In Situ 在司徒, 2021
presented as a looped 24 hour 18’×9′ LED at Harbin Charter Mall, Harbin, China

The situation of this landscape is an urban setting flanked by billboard graphics, sidewalks, and major daily traffic. With repeat passings likely, the animation, a monolith of light on a 1-hour loop, is intended to appear as an assortment of abstract views. While there may be more depth found in repeat or longer viewings, the content of this animation comes across at any glance. The scenes transition at the pace of slow deep breaths with a steady calm and effervescent rhythm of rivers, fields, and the night glow of local festivals. 

Shanghai 海上 ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea

ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上, 2020, ≅15’×15′ water cut aluminium, white paint. On display at CG iAPM, Shanghai, China.


Inspired by the work of Qavavau Manumie.
Canada Goose commissioned ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上 for their flagship Shanghai location. This piece was designed with the building facade in mind, as a way of creating a unique artist presentation, viewable from the store interior and exterior, alike.

A suspended sea plant landscape of where the ocean meets the land. A convergence. Fischer used linework from traditional Chinese landscape painting, illustrations of neuronal bridges, and representational elements from Manumie’s drawing practice.

Shanghai is located where the confluence of two rivers meets the Pacific ocean. The piece is intended to be an embodiment of where different worlds meet referring both to Canadian culture in China, and Southern Canadian and Inuit cultures represented in this piece.


SAMPLE INSPIRATION

Innervation of Purkinje Cells, Courtesy of the Cajal Institute, Spanish National Research Council or CSIC
Qavavau ManumieUntitled, 2016, 585×760mm / 23×30inch coloured pencil, graphite, and ink on paper
Qavavau ManumieUntitled, 2016, 585×760mm / 23×30inch coloured pencil, graphite, and ink on paper
Qavavau Manumieuntitled (Berry Picking), 2006-2007, 508×660mm / 20×26inch coloured pencil, pentel pen on paper
Qavavau Manumieuntitled (people and stick figures), 2008, 508×660mm / 20×26inch coloured pencil, graphite, and ink on paper

FABRICATION

ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上 aluminium fabrication at Baoding Hailong Metal
ᐃᒻᒪᕕᒻᒥ Upon the Sea 海上 aluminium fabrication at Baoding Hailong Metal

Toronto Story Tree

Story Tree, 2020, ≅15’×15’∅ aluminium tree, acrylic paint, pine base with steel counterweight on display at Canada Goose, Yorkdale Mall, Toronto, Canada

Qavavau Manumie’s drawings are the seeds from which Story Tree has grown. Manumie’s work is idiosyncratic and often amusing in his depictions of Inuit legends and mythology, Arctic wildlife and contemporary aspects of Inuit life. It is through this lens of cultural wisdom and whimsy that Alex Fischer has interpreted Manumie’s drawings for Story Tree. Equally significant is the influence of Kenojouac Ashevak, and Inuit art forebears to Fischer’s practice of digitally collecting, collaging and redrawing a site-specific tribute with a presence of its own.

Through the simplest means of bi-fold asymmetry, Fischer has planted Manumie’s drawings in physical space. Story Tree brings together distinct Northern and Southern perspectives with the mind of the viewer as their integral subject.

1, 7, and 6000 @ O’Born Contemporary

1, 7, and 6000

Alex Fischer, Solo Exhibition, O’Born Contemporary
February 2015

(1) On the occasion of Alex Fischer’s fourth solo exhibition with O’Born Contemporary, he problematizes the “single image” by its very conversion into multiple, nearly identical forms. A digital original is here reproduced as 1 digital print, 7 large oil paintings, and 6000 small acrylic paintings. Through this multi-modal exhibition, Fischer deliberates on the nature of art with its value systems and capitalist patrimony.

Current agricultural trends demonstrate that when tomatoes are grown, the aim is to direct natural processes, taking agency over evolution. Like all biological species, the tomato plant contains a genetic copy of itself inside every cell of its being. Repetition and versioning are as much a rule in agriculture as they are in human life. Conversely, uniqueness and independence of mind are selling points when it comes to art. There is an established value in originality.1.

(7) Each of the 7 oil paintings was completed by an equal number of painters working in Xiamen, China. Fischer puts the work of these trained hands in direct visual argument with the mechanically reproduced print: he suggests deliberation about the capitalist mechanism and simultaneously entertains his moral ambiguity within this landscape of unapologetic consumptive socio-culture.

The controversy here may be in the fact that Fischer criticizes the capitalist system by highlighting elements that are uncomfortable to acknowledge while fully engaging with capitalism’s ideologies through the kaleidoscope of fine art and its market. He grows the pieces, puts them under optimal lighting, and creates versions at price points to invite the viewer to buy.

(6000) An arched shelf bolsters 6000 small sheets of thin, transparent plastic. Hundreds have already been painted, revealing that they exist as an assemblage of tiles that, when properly arranged, mimic their parent image.

Artwork as a commodity is not valuable per se– its value is the result of an ongoing and never ending social negotiation. That being said, the work of art, and painting specifically, is an object that bears a concrete, almost measurable evidence of labour on its surface.2. Paintings are worked over and leave a trace of the individual mark maker. Each edition in 1, 7, and 6000 shows on its surface the inevitable difference made during translation between parent image and end product. Each image is the real thing.

1. This idea is commensurate with remarks issued by Ben Davis: It is the “uniquely middle-class nature of creative labor in the visual arts [that] would seem to explain its alternative emphasis on the individual, that is, on the virtues of personality and small production, as well as a whole host of other stylistic tics and affectations(…) visual art’s characteristic questioning or ironic attitude; the value of the artist’s signature and the “artist’s statement” that are associated with it.” Davis, Ben. 9.5 Theses on Art and Class – Commerce and Consciousness. Chicago:Haymarket Books, 2013. PDF file.

2. Graw, Isabelle. Thinking through Painting – Reflexivity and Agency beyond the Canvas. Sternberg Press, 2012. Page 56.

VII giclée, 2015
VII 冯声贵 Feng Shui Gui
VII 叶安 Ye An
VII 林建 Lin Jian
VII 江明 Jiang Ming
VII 陈山 Chen Shan
VII 陈文波 Chen Wen Bo
VII 陈秋林 Chen Qiu Lin

82 × 48 × 44 inch acrylic, aluminum, and steel

Beyond The Fall @ Galerie Bigué Art Contemporain

Island, 2011, 24 × 48 in inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed

Beyond The Fall
Alex Fischer, Solo Exhibition, Galerie BAC

Galerie BAC, Bigué Art Contemporain est heureuse de vous présenter la 1ère exposition solo Montréalaise de l’artiste Torontois, Alex Fischer. Cette exposition intitulée « Beyond the Fall » sera présentée du 9 au 26 mai 2012.

Alex Fischer offre une vue humaine sur des scènes futuristes; une vue qui explore des idéologies et des projections sur une société ayant un regard sur l’art contemporain.

Composant ses personnages et ses paysages avec un assemblage de visuel photographique, Fischer garde toujours en tête que l’idée du futur est inévitable auprès des gens et il maintient, dans ses images, la faiblesse et la susceptibilité de notre état.

Les sujets et personnages de ses œuvres sont une réflexion de syncrétisme. Leur identité extérieur est imposé, ils sont hétérogène, mêlé à un environnement non-conscient mais toutefois, les sujets peuvent être vue vivant dans un monde post-structural par le voyeur.

Island, Daily install
Daily, Paradise, Beyond The Fall install
Paradise, 2011, 15 × 11 3/8 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
Island, Daily, Paradise, Beyond The Fall install
Beyond The Fall, 2011, 43 × 64 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex on Dibond, Framed
Good Grief, 2010, 22 × 16 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
Blackfoot, 2011, 15 × 9 1/8 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
Good Grief, 2010, 5280 × 3840 pixels
Blackfoot, 2011, 4500 × 2742 pixels
Adobe Mask, Myrrha install
Adobe Mask, 2012, 5600 × 4518 pixels
Myrrha, 2011, 9 7/8 × 7 1/2 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, Black Gator, Framed
Beyond The Fall @ Galerie BAC
Cooks Cape, 2008, 15000 × 21000 pixels
untitled (Kind of Blue), 2011, 11 1/8  × 13 1/8 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
Aurora, 2011, 12 × 12.6 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex on Dibond, Framed
Cooks Cape, 2008, 60 × 84 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
untitled (Kind of Blue), 2011, 3934 × 3342 pixels
Aurora, 2011, 4410 × 4200 pixels
Cooks Cape, Parrots install
Parrots, 2011, 60 × 84 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
Supercollider, 48 × 48 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex, Dibond

Beyond The Fall @ O’Born Contemporary

Straw Man, 2012, 96 × 180 inch matte gicleé

Beyond The Fall
Alex Fischer, Solo Exhibition, O’Born Contemporary
February 4 – March 10, 2012

Artists must take responsibility for representing the time in which they live.

The images of Beyond The Fall come from what has become the predominant first-world interface: The personal computer and internet capable device is now the primary filter by which broad swaths of people interact and know themselves. These technologies have the ability to snake our attentions, beliefs and desires, influencing cognition and our experience of the world.

In order to represent these paradigm shifts, Alex Fischer reifies the low-culture of individualistic habits and persuasions to be in dialogue with the ripe philosophy of high art. His chosen medium of digital collage perfectly compliments his artistic process, by which he paints together images from a collection of digital sources. Each piece concedes to multiple interpretations due to Fischer’s choice to obscure the visual space of the image into near abstraction. The narratives encompass characters, scenes, and symbols with all of their ambiguity, insight, and metaphysical baggage on display. The content originates from their adaptations to and the impact of this current age.

Listing.pdf

Straw Man, cell pattern, Beyond The Fall, Purple Jesus install
Purple Jesus, bow, Supercollider, Greens install
Supercollider, 48 × 48 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex, Dibond
Purple Jesus, bow installed
bow, 2012, 15 1/2 × 23 5/8 light jet on Kodak Endura Metallic, Dibond, Framed
Purple Jesus, 2011, 3048 × 3145 pixels
Purple Jesus, 2011, 13 1/8 × 12 3/4  giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, Black Gator, Framed
Myrrha, 2011, 9 7/8 × 7 1/2 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, Black Gator, Framed
Artists Image, 2011, 11 3/4 × 8 5/8  inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
Myrrha, 2011, 1725 × 2277 pixels
Artists Image, 2011, 2080 × 2835 pixels
bluenose, Parrots, Myrrha, Artists Image
Parrots, 2011, 60 × 84 inch giclée on Epson Enhanced Matte, White Gator, Framed
bluenose, 2011, 15 × 11 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex on Dibond, Framed
The Infant and The Garden Hose, 2011, 15300 × 15300 pixels
Beyond The Fall, 2011, 43 × 64 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex on Dibond, Framed
The Infant and The Garden Hose, 2011, 47 × 47 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex 255gsm, Plexi
Beyond The Fall, 2011, 14720 × 9907 pixels
Aurora, installed
Aurora, 2011, 12 × 12.6 inch light jet on Fuji Crystal Archive Flex on Dibond, Framed
Aurora, 2011, 4410 × 4200 pixels

Smarter Today @ O’Born Contemporary

Smarter Today

Alex Fischer, Solo Exhibition
October 28 – December 4, 2010

Smarter Today offers a human view of futurist landscapes, a view that explores the ideologies and projections of society through the lens of contemporary art.

Alex Fischer composes his figures and landscapes by assembling a variety of visual and conceptual sources. Keeping in mind that ideas of the future are inevitably the fastest to change, Fischer maintains that human nature is a fallible and susceptible state.

Technological advancement and machine generations have vastly outpaced the tradition of the average human life. As a society, we have adapted to accept the pace at which vast differences and contrasts will influence our modes of being. All projections of which are unpredictable beyond our present context. Today more than ever before, we situate ourselves less as individuals and more as the product of multiple networks. While this network theory suggests a node’s relationship to other networks is more important than its own uniqueness, we find a backlash of reflection on individual circumstance and identity.

The subjects and characters of Smarter Today are reflections on the syncretism that created them. Their exterior identities have been extricated to include all of their precursors. They are heterogeneous and intermingled with their environments, yet maintain their subjectivity in the face of a post-structuralist world.

Smarter Today is Fischer’s debut solo exhibition with O’Born Contemporary.

(LEFT) The Invisible Man Returns 2010 47.88 × 32.00
(RIGHT) Cooks Cape 2010 60 × 84
Cooks Cape, 2010,
Trouble on Volcano Sundae, 2010,
Artists Retreat, 2010,
Trouble on Volcano Sundae, 2010, 16 × 14.7
Artists Retreat, 2010, 16 × 14.7
Grandfather Wreath, 2010
Three Fates, 2010, 60 × 92 in
(FAR LEFT) Bring Home the Bacon, 2010, 15 × 20 in
(LEFT) Untitled Greens, 2010, 15 × 20 in
(RIGHT) Figure Head, 2010, 57 × 55 in
Bring Home the Bacon, 2010,
Untitled Greens, 2010,
Knight (installed)
Teen Dream
Monster Mash
Good Grief
Fungus Philosopher
Dweller
Knight (installed)