Art of Alex Fischer

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ART SHOW, NAMARA Projects

Toronto, October 22, 2022 — January 6, 2023

I have been witnessing Alex Fischer’s practice throughout their professional career. Technology has always been instrumental to the artist’s process and its impact is evident in the content of resulting printed works. Fischer addresses narratives around technological production, online personhood, and digital authorship. These remain significant to the artist’s practice and hold new consequence in the age of tokenized digital art.

Equally important are the tethers Fischer maintains to traditional art and in particular, conventions of painting. The artist employs myriad digital brushstrokes. Textures, palettes and implied hand are sampled from historical and contemporary works alike. Fischer amalgamates manifold style, resulting in one that is undeniably their own. The artist’s oeuvre is in tension with itself. Seemingly unwilling to give in to digital tropes, visual language is neither a challenge nor concession to prevailing digital modes of artmaking.

Unlike previous series, collections or exhibitions, Art Show brings The Body to the fore. Dynamism characterizes youthful bodies, absorbed into their surroundings–or maybe not. Perhaps the figures are in fact emerging from their conditions. Are these scenes of struggle or performance? Are these avatars labouring within the digital space in which they were conceived–Seeking to separate, or at least to distinguish form from matter?

Fischer does not provide an answer. They embrace the “hybrid and fluid nature of things.” The artist plays with convention and embraces uncertainty. They point to the humanity in digital space without succumbing to it. Even in the more abstract compositions, the audience recognizes certain reflections: Eyes, limbs, movement, and flesh are present but more or less entwined with place.

Disentangling is work for the viewer.

Natalie MacNamara
Principal & Creative Director, NAMARA

Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects
Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects
Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects
Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects
Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects
Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects
Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects
Alex Fischer, Art Show, NAMARA Projects

In Situ with Polymetis

Harbin Charter Mall, China, August 2021

20'×60' polymer, steel, lights. 18'×9' LED Display.
1 hour animated video loop on view through 2022.

In summer 2021 Canada Goose comissioned Alex Fischer and artist duo Polymetis to create an installation for a 20'×60' public window in the heart of Harbin China. As with all projects we considered the space, it's construction, and the greater context of the city and the surrounding landscapes. Historically, in ancient China, "Situ" was one of the highest ranking government offices, with an original translation meaning Administrator of Land.

This works presence in an urban landscape has it flanked by billboard graphics, sidewalks, and major daily traffic. With repeat passings likely, the animation, a monolith of light on a 1 hour loop, appears as an assortment of abstract landscapes. While there may be more depth found in repeat or longer viewings, the content of this animation comes across at any glance. The scenes transition at the pace of deep slow breaths, a steady calm and effervescent rhythm of rivers, fields, and festivals.

In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment
In Situ, 15 sec animation segment

Bending Towards the Sun, YYZ

Toronto, April 2019

YYZ 40 Exhibition, Bending Towards the Sun features the work of Frances Adair, Grayson Alabiso-Cahill, JD Banke, Liam Crockard, Patrick Cruz, Stan Douglas, Alex Fischer, Hanna Hur, Aaron Jones, Laurie Kang, Garrett Lockhart, Trevor Mahovsky & Rhonda Weppler, Jenine Marsh, Darby Milbrath, Susy Oliveira, Walter Scott, Shannon Garden Smith, Jana Sterbak, and Sean Stewart

Curated by Veronika Ivanova, “Bending Towards the Sun” is a fundraising exhibition in support of YYZ. “Bending Towards the Sun” celebrates YYZ Artists’ Outlet—their growth and transformation over the past 40 years, and their resilience and ability to thrive in a climate increasingly hostile to cultural work.

Bending Towards the Sun</em>, YYZ, Toronto, Canada 2019
Bending Towards the Sun</em>, YYZ, Toronto, Canada 2019
Bending Towards the Sun</em>, YYZ, Toronto, Canada 2019
Bending Towards the Sun</em>, YYZ, Toronto, Canada 2019
Bending Towards the Sun</em>, YYZ, Toronto, Canada 2019
Super Seed B&WBlue, 160829, 14×11″ / 356×280㎜ print

RBC Painting Competition, The Power Plant

Toronto, September 2016

The fifteen RBC Canadian Painting Competition finalists are selected by a distinguished jury from the Canadian art community to represent the emerging voices that explore, challenge, and embrace the nature of the medium.

Finalists of 2016's RBC Canadian Painting Competition are: Wallis Cheung (Toronto), Alex Fischer (Toronto), Nika Fontaine (Berlin), Cameron Forbes (Saskatoon), Stephanie Hier (Toronto), Brian Hunter (Winnipeg), Hanna Hur (Los Angeles), Brian Kokoska (New York), Andrew Maize (Lunenburg), Keita Morimoto (Toronto), Justine Skahan (Gatineau), M.E. Sparks (Vancouver), Angela Teng (Vancouver), geetha thurairajah (Sackville), and Ambera Wellmann (Guelph).

RBC Painting Competition, The Power Plant, Toronto, Canada 2016
RBC Painting Competition, The Power Plant, Toronto, Canada 2016
Pet, Casper and Hesperie, 160622, 48×54″ / 1219×1371mm paint on canvas
Dip, 160419, 6100×4796px, 14×11″ / 356×280㎜ print
Look Out Lucinda, 160804, 6234×4898px, 14×11″ / 356×280㎜ print
Save Cave B&W Blue, 160828, 3478×2732px, 14×11″ / 356×280㎜ print
Willow Fire, 160828, 14×11″ / 356×280㎜ print
With Picabia's Hand, 160828, 3520×2765px, 14×11″ / 356×280㎜ print

The Collective, O'Born Contemporary

Toronto, April - May 2015

A survey of the collected artists exhibited at O'Born Contemporary.

The Collective, O'Born Contemporary
The Collective, O'Born Contemporary
The Collective, O'Born Contemporary
Seeding, 120608, 8942×5961px, 21×14″ / 534×356㎜ print
Mangrove Down, 120701, 20945×12677px, 74¾×45¼″ / 1900×1150㎜ print
Feather Feeder, 130127, 13000×15000px, 36×42″ / 925×1067㎜ print
Loop (Santiago), 130520, 12040×9632px, 43×34″ / 1092×874㎜ print
A General Impression, 130513, 3300×2550px, 11×8½″ / 279×216㎜ print

1, 7, and 6000, O'Born Contemporary

Toronto, February 2015

(1) On the occasion of Alex Fischer's fourth solo exhibition with O'Born Contemporary, he problematizes the "single image" by its very conversion into multiple, nearly identical forms. A digital original is here reproduced as 1 digital print, 7 large oil paintings, and 6000 small acrylic paintings. Through this multi-modal exhibition, Fischer deliberates on the nature of art with its value systems and capitalist patrimony.

Current agricultural trends demonstrate that when tomatoes are grown, the aim is to direct natural processes, taking agency over evolution. Like all biological species, the tomato plant contains a genetic copy of itself inside every cell of its being. Repetition and versioning are as much a rule in agriculture as they are in human life. Conversely, uniqueness and independence of mind are selling points when it comes to art. There is an established value in originality.1.

(7) Each of the 7 oil paintings was completed by an equal number of painters working in Xiamen, China. Fischer puts the work of these trained hands in direct visual argument with the mechanically reproduced print: he suggests deliberation about the capitalist mechanism and simultaneously entertains his moral ambiguity within this landscape of unapologetic consumptive socio-culture.

The controversy here may be in the fact that Fischer criticizes the capitalist system by highlighting elements that are uncomfortable to acknowledge while fully engaging with capitalism's ideologies through the kaleidoscope of fine art and its market. He grows the pieces, puts them under optimal lighting, and creates versions at price points to invite the viewer to buy.

(6000) An arched shelf bolsters 6000 small sheets of thin, transparent plastic. Hundreds have already been painted, revealing that they exist as an assemblage of tiles that, when properly arranged, mimic their parent image. Fischer will paint the remaining sheets on demand as they are requested and will continue this practice alongside his other projects.

Artwork as a commodity is not valuable per se– its value is the result of an ongoing and never ending social negotiation. That being said, the work of art, and painting specifically, is an object that bears a concrete, almost measurable evidence of labour on its surface.2. Paintings are worked over and leave a trace of the individual mark maker. Each edition in 1, 7, and 6000 shows on its surface the inevitable difference made during translation between parent image and end product. Each image is the real thing.

1. This idea is commensurate with remarks issued by Ben Davis: It is the "uniquely middle-class nature of creative labor in the visual arts [that] would seem to explain its alternative emphasis on the individual, that is, on the virtues of personality and small production, as well as a whole host of other stylistic tics and affectations(...) visual art's characteristic questioning or ironic attitude; the value of the artist's signature and the "artist's statement" that are associated with it." Davis, Ben. 9.5 Theses on Art and Class - Commerce and Consciousness. Chicago:Haymarket Books, 2013. PDF file.

2. Graw, Isabelle. Thinking through Painting - Reflexivity and Agency beyond the Canvas. Sternberg Press, 2012. Page 56.

1, 7, and 6000, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
1, 7, and 6000, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
1, 7, and 6000, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
1, 7, and 6000, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
VII 6000 Arch, 2015, A 82×48×40in acrylic and aluminium arch bolstering two hundred and forty 6×4in painted sheets.
1, 7, and 6000 install at O'Born Contemporary
1, 7, and 6000 install vii 陈文波 evening
1, 7, and 6000 concept sketch
1, 7, and 6000 concept sketch
1, 7, and 6000 install at O'Born Contemporary
1, 7, and 6000, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
1, 7, and 6000 install at O'Born Contemporary
(VII 江明 Jiang Ming, 2015),(VII 林建 Lin Jian, 2015),(VII 陈⽂文波 Chen Wen Bo, 2015),(VII 陈秋林 Chen Qiu Lin, 2015),(VII 冯声贵 Feng Shui Gui, 2015),(VII 叶安 Ye An, 2015),(VII 陈⼭山 Chen Shan, 2015)
VII Alex Fischer, 2015, 60×48″ print
VII 冯声贵 Feng Shui Gui, 2015, 60×48″ oil on canvas
VII 叶安 Ye An, 2015, 60×48″ oil on canvas
VII 林建 Lin Jian, 2015, 60×48″ oil on canvas
VII 江明 Jiang Ming, 2015, 60×48″ oil on canvas
VII 陈山 Chen Shan, 2015, 60×48″ oil on canvas
VII 陈文波 Chen Wen Bo, 2015, 60×48″ oil on canvas
VII 陈秋林 Chen Qiu Lin, 2015, 60×48″ oil on canvas

Simulators, Angell Gallery

Toronto, February 21 to March 22, 2014

ANGELL GALLERY is pleased to present SIMULATORS II, an exhibition of new digital art featuring nine artists — Napoleon Brousseau, Mitchell F. Chan, Alex Fischer, Francoise Gamma, Brenna Murphy, Aamna Muzaffar, Rafael Ochoa, Geoffrey Pugen and Tobias Williams. The exhibition is up in the east and west galleries from February 21 to March 22, 2014. A related exhibition by Philippe Blanchard will run concurrently in the Project Room.

In recent critical discussion, the phrase Post-Internet art has surfaced to replace the term New Media, reflecting the now ubiquitous nature of digital technology. Now that the Internet has shifted from novelty to normalcy, Post-Internet artists are focusing less on the means and more on the ends, creating work that couples virtual reality with a strong material presence. The art world’s embrace of this new phase was signaled by the first auction dedicated exclusively to digital art, staged by renowned auction house, Phillips, in October of 2013. Angell Gallery has been at the forefront of promoting this new wave of digital practice, and in SIMULATORS II the gallery showcases artists who represent the exciting diversity of this rapidly expanding field.

[...]

Alex Fischer, a self-styled “sociologist of internet culture”, combs the web for diverse images drawn from art, science and technology. These he twists and turns, mows and mulches, to produce brand new entities in the forms of digital paintings and sculptures that tease us with hints at narrative possibilities while straddling the borders of abstraction. [...]

Simulators II, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators II, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators II, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators II, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Is Water, 130611, 9690×16320px, 24¼×40¾″ / 603×1016㎜ print
Similar Object (b), 2013, 15¾×47¼ screenprint on mirror

Translation, O'Born Contemporary

Toronto, Curated by Rachel Anne Farquharson, March 2013

A translation can be many things: It can be a conversion or transformation from one physical form to another, it can be a progression in biological stage, and it can even be, in the most geometric of terms, the movement of a shape along an axis. Within art's pedagogical premise, the most apt definition for translation might be the rendering of something into one's own language, semiotically or aesthetically. Viewed through this lens, geographies that are foreign, ideologies that are suspect, and modes of technology to which we find ourselves unwittingly beholden need a level plane upon which to exist in globalized society. The arrow of understanding, as Translation permits, rarely points in one direction, however. The exhibition provides recourse to how translations can also abet the fetishization of objects, enabling simple acts to suddenly become estranged.

Each artist in Translation confronts the banal, at once making it pliable to our understanding and relocating it in the realm of the monumental through inherently indexical material. Alex Fischer reappropriates digital imagery culled from today's archival internet abyss, exacting the terror of the sublime through an exposition of our dissolved communion with nature. As the artist's high-resolution content surpasses any interface capable of displaying the work in its "natural state", it is revealed that human vision has entered into stalemate with contemporary pixel acuity and printing technology.

[...]

In conversation, the artists in this exhibition aim to translate aspects of life, either by material or digital processes. Transformed in these ways, the landscapes of social, psychic, cultural, physical and political content breach the boundaries of ordinary experience, inciting their audience to new personal and collective understanding.

Translation, O'Born Contemporary
Translation, O'Born Contemporary
Translation, O'Born Contemporary
Translation, O'Born Contemporary
Translation, O'Born Contemporary
Earlier, 110909, 16¾×12⅗″″ / 427×320㎜ print
Aurora, 110504, 4200px×4200px, 12×12⅗″ / 305×320㎜ print

Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary

Toronto, October 18 – November 16, 2013

Alex Fischer's latest body of work counter-poses the primordial origins of biology against today's dominant technology-based vernacular. In earnest, the artist acknowledges through his practice elements peculiar to the time of his being. Put in alternative terms, Fischer concedes that the acts of being and becoming are wholly different now than at any time in our recent or distant past.

Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules poses a valuable and contemporary question using sensory terms--can the digital reconcile with the physical? The works of art comprising this materially varied exhibition reveal themselves as both answers to and instigators of this question. Through digital manipulations, sculpture, and installation, Fischer convinces his audience that technology is not simply an imbricate to the physical and the palpable but rather supersedes both.

The multi-modal moment in which art-making has found itself produces what could be called "moist media", a curious but worthwhile corollary to the McLuhan's "cold media" of days past. Absorbing this idea, Fischer wedges himself between the dry, cold of the pixel and the wetness of biomolecules. Ultimately suggesting that we are living in a post-digital world, the artist exposes a tactility and precision with his imagery that in effect surpasses the daily surroundings we perceive with our own eyes and bodies.

Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Dry Pixels and Wet Molecules, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2013
Shellfish Cells, 130130, 15000×12000px, 9⅝×7⅝″ / 244×195㎜ print
Feather Feeder, 130127, 13000×15000px, 36×42″ / 925×1067㎜ print
Nervous System Preserver, 2013, 13¾×13¾×2¾in nylon 3d print
Mouth, 121009, 33750×49275px, 100×146″ / 2544×3714㎜ print
Mangrove Down, 120701, 20945×12677px, 74¾×45¼″ / 1900×1150㎜ print
Loop (Santiago), 130520, 12040×9632px, 43×34″ / 1092×874㎜ print
Similar Object (b), 2013, 15¾×47¼ screenprint on mirror
Ready To Ooze, 120320, 63⅛×37⅝″ / 1608×958㎜ print
A General Impression, 130513, 3300×2550px, 11×8½″ / 279×216㎜ print
Disc, 130829, 98×48″ / 2438×1218㎜ print
Jelly Portrait, 130322, 27×25⅝″ / 686×653㎜ print
Seeding, 120608, 8942×5961px, 21×14″ / 534×356㎜ print

Guest Room, p|m gallery

Toronto, September 2013

An extensive group show and fundrasier for ArtBarrage

Alex Fischer, VOLTA NY

New York City, March 2012

A solo booth presentation at VOLTA NY 2012 edition.

Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Parrots, 110901, 60×84″ / 1524×2134㎜ print
Untitled Gaze, 110203, 4643×3407px, 15×11″ / 382×280㎜ print
Bluenose, 110516, 4643×3407px, 15×11″ / 382×280㎜ print
bow, 111019, 8364×10677px, 18×23″ / 470×600㎜ print
Supercollider, 110619, 14000×14000px, 48×48″ / 1220×1220㎜ print
Island, 110222, 48×24″ / 610×1219㎜ print
Purple Jesus, 110511, 3145×3048px, 13×12″ / 333×323㎜ print
Kind Of Blue, 110615, 11⅛×13⅛″ / 283×333㎜ print
Beyond The Fall, 111105, 9907×14720px, 43×64″ / 1094×1626㎜ print

Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary

Toronto, February 4 – March 10, 2012

Artists must take responsibility for representing the time in which they live.

The images of Beyond The Fall come from what has become the predominant first-world interface: The personal computer and internet capable device is now the primary filter by which broad swaths of people interact and know themselves. These technologies have the ability to snake our attentions, beliefs and desires, influencing cognition and our experience of the world.

In order to represent these paradigm shifts, Alex Fischer reifies the low-culture of individualistic habits and persuasions to be in dialogue with the ripe philosophy of high art. His chosen medium of digital collage perfectly compliments his artistic process, by which he paints together images from a collection of digital sources. Each piece concedes to multiple interpretations due to Fischer's choice to obscure the visual space of the image into near abstraction. The narratives encompass characters, scenes, and symbols with all of their ambiguity, insight, and metaphysical baggage on display. The content originates from their adaptations to and the impact of this current age.

Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012
Beyond The Fall, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto 2012

Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC (Bigué Art Contemporain)

Montréal, May 2012

Galerie BAC, Bigué Art Contemporain est heureuse de vous présenter la 1ère exposition solo Montréalaise de l’artiste Torontois, Alex Fischer. Cette exposition intitulée « Beyond the Fall » sera présentée du 9 au 26 mai 2012.

Alex Fischer offre une vue humaine sur des scènes futuristes; une vue qui explore des idéologies et des projections sur une société ayant un regard sur l’art contemporain.

Composant ses personnages et ses paysages avec un assemblage de visuel photographique, Fischer garde toujours en tête que l’idée du futur est inévitable auprès des gens et il maintient, dans ses images, la faiblesse et la susceptibilité de notre état.

Les sujets et personnages de ses œuvres sont une réflexion de syncrétisme. Leur identité extérieur est imposé, ils sont hétérogène, mêlé à un environnement non-conscient mais toutefois, les sujets peuvent être vue vivant dans un monde post-structural par le voyeur.

Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012
Beyond The Fall, Galerie BAC, Montréal 2012

Simulators, Angell Gallery

Toronto, November 2012

ANGELL GALLERY is pleased to present SIMULATORS, an exhibition showcasing new work by eight artists who are at the forefront of contemporary digital art practices — Philippe Blanchard, David Clarkson, Alex Fischer, Brianna Lowe, Alex McLeod, Rafael Ochoa, Jon Rafman and Jillian Ross. The exhibition is on throughout the gallery from November 3 to December 1, 2012. An opening reception will be held on November 3, 1:00 – 4:00 PM. Digital technology has created a revolution in the art world, spawning the first new medium to arise since the birth of the artists' videos in the 1960s. Encompassing an astonishingly wide range of approaches, digital art is now exhibited and collected by major museums, and is sought after by collectors worldwide. Angell Gallery has been a leader in promoting digital art practices, and the artists in Simulators demonstrate the varied possibilities of this new medium, which as a creative tool is both demanding and limitless. Using software with the dexterity with which painters traditionally wielded the brush, the artists in Simulators create digital paintings, videos and animations that intrigue, inspire and engage. The featured artists are each recognized for their unique contributions to this developing medium.

[...]

Alex Fischer reconfigures art world images sampled from the web to construct richly layered, painterly landscape and figural compositions that belie the means of their creation. Ranging from Romantic solitary wanderers to composite faces that suggest a cyber-age Bosch, Fischer's expressive mash-ups are held together by his canny sense of colour and composition. The Toronto-based Fischer graduated from York University with a BFA in Visual Arts, and is represented in noted collections. His work has been featured in Black/Flash, Beautiful/Decay and The Walrus, among others.

[...]

Simulators, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016
Simulators, Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016

Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary

Toronto, October 28 – December 4, 2010

Smarter Today offers a human view of futurist landscapes, a view that explores the ideologies and projections of society through the lens of contemporary art.

Alex Fischer composes his figures and landscapes by assembling a variety of visual and conceptual sources. Keeping in mind that ideas of the future are inevitably the fastest to change, Fischer maintains that human nature is a fallible and susceptible state.

Technological advancement and machine generations have vastly outpaced the tradition of the average human life. As a society, we have adapted to accept the pace at which vast differences and contrasts will influence our modes of being. All projections of which are unpredictable beyond our present context. Today more than ever before, we situate ourselves less as individuals and more as the product of multiple networks. While this network theory suggests a node's relationship to other networks is more important than its own uniqueness, we find a backlash of reflection on individual circumstance and identity.

The subjects and characters of Smarter Today are reflections on the syncretism that created them. Their exterior identities have been extricated to include all of their precursors. They are heterogeneous and intermingled with their environments, yet maintain their subjectivity in the face of a post-structuralist world.

Smarter Today is Fischer's debut solo exhibition with O'Born Contemporary.

Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016
Smarter Today, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2016

131, O'Born Contemporary

Toronto, 2009

131 features works from Robert Canali, Liam Crockard, Alex Fischer, Rafael Goldchain, Kate McQuillen, John Monteith, Dominic Nahr, Ed Ou and Noel Rodo-Vankeulen.

131 brings together this diverse group of artists to inaugurate our new space, to introduce our new curatorial team and foremost, to announce our broadened approach to medium-specific programming.

O'Born Contemporary was established as a gallery, exhibiting contemporary photographic and lens-based works by living artists. This shall be maintained in our new space with the addition of works of all mediums, conceptually or practically linked to photography or its history.

The artists that represent us are photographers, journalists, documentarians, painters, sculptors, builders and thinkers; they do not necessarily commit themselves to a single mode of expression but all contribute to the ongoing dialogue of photography's place in contemporary art practices.

[...]

Alex Fischer's work is fodder for discourse on digital image-making. His work is heavily layered, both theoretically and visually, challenging notions of appropriation and ownership. Through reference to work of practicing artists and subsequent abstraction thereof, Fischer creates a rich and elegant aestheticization of contemporary art history in social media. [...]

131, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2009
131, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2009
131, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2009
131, O'Born Contemporary, Toronto, 2009
Plans For A Home, 2010, 7200×6177px, 24×20½″ / 610×523㎜ print
Salt Lake Schulnik, 2010, 3936×3600px, 16×15″ / 417×381㎜ print
Spider From Venus, 2010

Alex Fischer, The Spoke Club

Toronto, 2009

Alex Fischer, The Spoke Club, Toronto, 2009
Alex Fischer, The Spoke Club, Toronto, 2009
Alex Fischer, The Spoke Club, Toronto, 2009
Alex Fischer, The Spoke Club, Toronto, 2009
Alex Fischer, The Spoke Club, Toronto, 2009

This is not a bout, Special Projcts Gallery

Toronto, 2009

This is not a bout, Special Projcts Gallery, York University, Toronto
This is not a bout, Special Projcts Gallery, York University, Toronto
This is not a bout, Special Projcts Gallery, York University, Toronto
This is not a bout, Special Projcts Gallery, York University, Toronto

Facing The Screen, University of Toronto Art Centre

Toronto, 2009

Facing the Screen investigates the complex relationship that exists between painting and digital technologies. This public event is associated with the ongoing art lounge exhibition that will function as its physical and conceptual background. We welcome four important Canadian painters who are also faculty members in the fine arts programs at universities in the Toronto area.

Facing The Screen
Facing The Screen

Backwater Resolution, The Gales Gallery

Toronto, 2009

Peinture fraîche / Fresh Paint, Art Mur

Montréal, 2008

Peinture fraîche / Fresh Paint, Art Mur, Montréal, 2008
Peinture fraîche / Fresh Paint, Art Mur, Montréal, 2008

Thank You

A heartfelt thank you to those who help make this possible: Family, friends, techs, fabricators, framers, and installers, as well as the generous support of many private patrons, and notably Donald O'Born, BNY Mellon, Canada Goose, Eqitable Bank, Equinor, Leith Wheeler, Shrigley Battrick, TD Bank Group, and The Ontario Arts Council.

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  • merci de votre visite
  • na gode don ziyarar
  • ਦਾ ਦੌਰਾ ਕਰਨ ਲਈ ਤੁਹਾਡਾ ਧੰਨਵਾਦ
  • danke für den besuch
  • お越し頂きありがとうございます
  • تشکر از بازدید شما